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How to connect a BridgeCom BCR repeater to an RLC Controller

How to connect a BridgeCom BCR repeater to an RLC Controller

Ron Kochanowicz, KCØQVT, and Chuck Kraly, KØXM demonstrate setting up a BridgeCom BCR repeater and an RLC controller.

Then they hook them together and show you how to program and tune them to function properly. 

This procedure can help with hooking up other controllers as well.

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Top 4 Must Have Accessories For The BCH-220 And BCH-270

Top 4 Must Have Accessories For The BCH-220 And BCH-270

The BCH-220 and BCH-270 are fantastic radios by itself. With these 4 accessories they turn into a super handhelds, capable of handling any situation with ease.  Microphone   A good speaker microphone is a must for Increased clarity and convenience.  The BridgeCom BCS-200 Water Resistant Speaker...

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Dayton Hamvention 2017 Reflection

Dayton Hamvention 2017 Reflection

What can I say about Dayton Hamvention 2017 other than WOW! It had everything; Great venue, 30,000 of your favorite ham radio friends, great vendors, Rain, Rain, and more Rain, good food, great buys, mud and on-site camping. Did I...

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At BridgeCom Quality and Customer Service is not Lost

At BridgeCom Quality and Customer Service is not Lost

I had an interesting exchange over email with a potential customer recently. I believe it perfectly illustrates BridgeCom's commitment to quality products and industry leading customer service. Please enjoy, and if you have questions let me know.Regards,TimCustomer:Hello...Came across your page...

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Best 220 Mobile on the Market! BCM-220 1.25m

Best 220 Mobile on the Market! BCM-220 1.25m

Juan T. ★★★★★ Best 220 Mobile on the Market! Recently I vacationed around New Mexico and Southeastern Arizona. I had programmed my new BCM-220 mobile with all of the New Mexico 220 repeaters including those from Arizona. Though the radio's...

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Press Release: BCM-144 & BCM-440 Mobile Radios

Press Release: BCM-144 & BCM-440 Mobile Radios

April 24, 2017BridgeCom Systems, IncPhone: (816)532-8451 E-Mail: tim@BridgeComSystems.comContact: Tim KingPress Release: NEW BCM-144 & BCM-440 Mobile Radios Now Shipping________________________________________________________________________BridgeCom Systems, Inc is pleased to announce the availability of BCM-144 and BCM-440 Mobile Radio for the amateur radio market. The join...

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Amateur Radio Linking Explained

Amateur Radio Linking Explained

Amateur Linking What is amateur radio linking and why is it so important, necessary, or just plain fun? Let's say you want to set up a repeater at Hamvention and talk to the group back home. How is that possible?...

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Review: BridgeCom Systems BCM-220 222 MHz FM Transceiver by QST

Review: BridgeCom Systems BCM-220 222 MHz FM Transceiver by QST

Reviewed by Rick Palm, K1CE
QST Contributing Editor 
k1ce@arrl.org

BCM-220 1.25m Mobile RadioUsing BridgeCom Systems’ new 222 MHz (1.25 meter band) mobile radio was a walk down memory lane for me. In the late ’70s and early ’80s, I was part of a small, quirky but devoted group who ragchewed on two 220 MHz repeaters in northern Connecticut and western Massachusetts. One machine was on Talcott Mountain overlooking Hartford, and was run by the son of a major city developer. The other was owned/ controlled by my longtime friend, Paul Koplow, WA1VEI, on Mt Lincoln in the Berkshires. Our radios back then were quirky, too: mine was a Midland (crystalcontrolled, no PLL) that looked like a battered, old CB radio from a trucker’s cab — the kind you might find today in a pawn shop. Later I had a Yaesu Memorizer for the band, which was a great radio. We rolled our eyes and suffered one user who used the autopatch to talk with his wife on his commute home every evening with over-the-top kissing and cooing sounds. Off-air and even on-the-air counseling sailed over his head.

Nowadays, the 222 – 225 MHz band is still a great spot for repeaters and their disciples. I had a lot of fun getting back on this band thanks to the BridgeCom BCM-220. Continuing with the nostalgic theme here, the company, which is based in Smithville, Missouri, evokes the feel and quality of those old radios in their new products, especially this one. The BCM-220 is built like a tank, with commercial-grade construction, and a high-quality, heavy-duty mic that eschews the numerous functions/ buttons that populate some mics. The BCM-220’s mic has a simple DTMF keypad and only three function buttons below it: the first to switch between memory and VFO modes, and the second and third buttons for frequency or channel up and down. That’s it — and I love it! It’s heavy and feels good in my mic hand. Indeed, all of the radio’s functionality seems to be focused on the essentials, and that’s a plus in my book. 

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