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BridgeCom Official Blog

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  • September 2, 2015 Tim King

    BridgeCom Systems MV-1 RoIP Site Linking Video

    How does the BridgeCom Systems MV-1 RoIP site linking solution work? Watch the video and see RoIP used to link two "sites." What's in the video: One channel of audio at each site. Each site contains a UHF mobilie radio...

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  • August 13, 2015 Tim King

    Ohio Hospital uses BridgeCom Systems to link LTR Communication System

    In a critical situation communication is key. This is especially true in a hospital where lives are on the line. In one Ohio hospital system they face a greater challenge. How can several of the hospital buildings, spread out over a distance, communicate like they are one? 

    The Requirement: Create a seamless communication network so the hospitals can communicate together using the existing LTR communication system over four three channel sites.

    BridgeCom TL-NET Hospital SolutionThe Solution: Deploy BridgeCom Systems TL-NET multi-site networking communication system. The hospitals have four LTR sites with three channels each. The main site will use a TL-NET Gateway, connected to three TL-NET Controllers. Then the controllers will be connected to their existing repeaters, and finally to the internet. The three other sites will use a TL-NET MV-2 and TL-NET MV-1 connected to three BridgeCom BCR Repeaters. What do all the pieces do and how do

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  • August 7, 2015 Tim King

    Hoosier DMR adds new MV-DMR Bridge

    From Hoosier DMR Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/HoosierDMR/posts/1472842543034680?notif_t=page_tag As we sit back and relish where Hoosier DMR has come from since its inception and the struggles we have endured, I am overwhelmed by the growth we have seen in just under a year....

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  • July 28, 2015 Tim King

    HAM-RADIO "TALKING POINTS" by Myron A. Calhoun, W0PBV

    HAM-RADIO "TALKING POINTS":

    1) Because it's shorter, we usually say "HAM" instead of "amateur radio". No one actually knows where the word "HAM" came from, but some of us think it might stand for "Hardly Any Money"!-)

    2) Speaking of MONEY, it costs CONSIDERABLY LESS to be a HAM than it does to have a cellphone:

    * HAM-license study materials are available on the Internet

    * It costs about $15 to take the test

    * It costs less than $30 for a dual-band VHF/UHF "handi-talkie" radio from Amazon.com or eBay.com

    * On the other hand, if you have gobs of money, you can spend it in HAM radio ... just as you can spend gobs of money on other hobbies (fancy cars/boats/airplanes, golf clubs, horses, home-entertainment systems, giant-screen TV's, ....) [FWIW, while I have owned and still own more-expensive radios, I paid $200 in 1975 (about $800 in today's inflated greenies) for my favorite HAM rig, a Ten-Tec Triton IV (aka Model 540) which is still going strong!]

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  • FM Repeaters – An Introduction
    June 19, 2015 Tim King

    FM Repeaters – An Introduction

    Article by Stu Turner, WØSTU

    Operating on VHF/UHF FM repeaters is one of the most popular activities in amateur radio. For the new ham, FM repeater ops are often the first and most common on-air experiences, but accessing repeaters also represents a significant initial vexation for the new ham to overcome. Mastering the integrated concepts of frequency pairs, tones or other squelch methods, transceiver channel programming, and repeater on-air protocols is the first significant operational challenge that many hams will encounter in their new hobby.

    BCR Repeater Installs

    This article introduces fundamental concepts of FM repeater operations for the new ham and depicts a high level view of typical FM phone repeater anatomy and functioning. The goal is to demystify repeaters and help the newly licensed Technician overcome any initial bewilderment about repeaters. Let’s get off to a great start in ham radio with solid footing in repeaters!

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  • Why 220 MHz for Amateur Ham Radio, V2.0?
    June 19, 2015 Ron Kochanowicz

    Why 220 MHz for Amateur Ham Radio, V2.0?

    220 MHz amateur radio boasts of a long and colorful history, affording it a special place in the hearts of amateur radio enthusiasts. 

    Conceptually, amateur radio repeaters are not too different from public safety devices (fire, first response, police) or those in use at federal, business or military services. However, they are often assembled (power supplies, transmitter, receivers, antenna etc.) or commercially packaged to operate only within amateur RF (radio frequency) bands, like 222-224.995 220 MHz band.

    History

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) approved VHF bands as early as 1938, one of them being 1.25 meters (224 MHz) band. Amateur radio activity spiked rapidly in 1960s and 1970s, as 2m and 70cm bands swiftly rose to prominence in the hobby. The commercial spectrum of the VHF and UHF bands became the backbone of emergency service communications like police, fire and ems. The 1.25m band however, escaped the commercial popularity - partly due to lack of enough commercial frequency allocations. Add to it, commercial radio equipment for the band has been scarce. Amateurs willing to go live on this band have had to build their own equipment or buy specialized amateur radio equipment from designated manufacturers.

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  • June 17, 2015 Tim King

    BridgeCom visits Ham-Com 2015 Irving, TX

    Here are some thoughts and pictures from our visit to Ham-Com 2015 in Irving, TX.

    BridgeCom Systems Ham-Com 2015 BoothRon and I left the Kansas City, MO area on Thursday morning and it was 80+ degrees.  When we got to TX it was 90+ degrees, so summer is officially here.  

    Driving from MO to TX without the radio on leaves for a lot of random conversation, good, but random.  Ron and I discussed our thoughts and expectations for Ham-Com.  We expected to have a good booth location, plenty of foot traffic, and generate a positive buzz surrounding BridgeCom Systems and our products.  We packed with us three repeaters (BCR-50V, BCR-220, BCR-40U), the new BCM-220 mobile, and our MV-DMR server in a 2U chassis, plus the assorted banners and spec sheets.  

    We arrived in TX about 3:30p Thursday and went straight to the Irving Convention Center to unload and set up.  The people of TX are very nice, lots of yes sir, no sir.  We got set up pretty quickly, we like to keep the booth small with just a few products and brochures.  I'm not a fan of the table across the entire front of the booth, but it seemed to work well this time giving us some shelter from the masses.  However, I should have put the banners out front on the corners where people could have seen them better.

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