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The Role Of Radio In Die Hard

The Role Of Radio In Die Hard

Jen Glifort

In July 1988, Die Hard was released in theaters. Although it received mixed reviews at the time, it has quickly become a classic of the action genre. Thirty years and four sequels later (with another in the works), it’s clear that the legacy endures. By now, the films follow a tried-and-true formula, and radio is a crucial part of it...

Click the link to continue reading. 

http://www.arrl.org/files/file/QST/This%20Month%20in%20QST/July2018/Glifort.pdf

If you want to be as cool as Bruce Willis, you need a good handheld to survive those pesky building robberies. These handhelds will perform flawlessly for the situation. 

Anytone AT D868UV Dual-Band DMR Handheld Radio - Dual Band Analog and DMR. 2m and 70cm Band.

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Comments

Bill Farrell - April 20, 2020

C,‘mon man we’re talking Bruce Willis here and he can just yell at the battery to stay charged.

Patrick Vadnais - March 17, 2020

I always get a chuckle every time I watch Die Hard and see the radio scenes

The radio is a Kenwood 220MHz HT, John McClain claims it to be “emergency channel 9”, yet the police dispatch claims he’s on a police channel (LAPD was 460Mhz in 1988, I think) , and continues to talk to his police buddy downstairs for the rest of the movie on the same radio and we never hear any other police radio traffic, but he does manage to talk to the terrorists on the same 220 radio and even double with the dispatch and be heard while she’s talking.

Oh, and I want a radio with THAT kind of battery life in such a small package.

It is still one of my favorite Christmas time movies, though.

N0MSW - February 24, 2020

The BCH-220 is a dead link

David Geller - January 20, 2020

Your link to the BCH-220 isn’t working.

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