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BridgeCom Official Blog

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  • September 14, 2015 Tim King

    A Few New Ham Radio Podcasts By K0NR

    I'm always looking for new information and resources.  Today I came across K0NR's blog with links to audio podcasts that I really enjoyed.  Please have a read and enjoy like I did! - Tim Listening to podcasts has been part of...

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  • September 9, 2015 Tim King

    BridgeCom Systems Adds Pinterest

    The world of Pinterest has come to BridgeCom Systems. We will be adding product photos, videos, install photos and much more to our Pinterest page.  "Now you can easily pin BridgeCom photos and other content to our Pinterest page. We...

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  • August 7, 2015 Tim King

    Hoosier DMR adds new MV-DMR Bridge

    From Hoosier DMR Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/HoosierDMR/posts/1472842543034680?notif_t=page_tag As we sit back and relish where Hoosier DMR has come from since its inception and the struggles we have endured, I am overwhelmed by the growth we have seen in just under a year....

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  • July 28, 2015 Tim King

    HAM-RADIO "TALKING POINTS" by Myron A. Calhoun, W0PBV

    HAM-RADIO "TALKING POINTS":

    1) Because it's shorter, we usually say "HAM" instead of "amateur radio". No one actually knows where the word "HAM" came from, but some of us think it might stand for "Hardly Any Money"!-)

    2) Speaking of MONEY, it costs CONSIDERABLY LESS to be a HAM than it does to have a cellphone:

    * HAM-license study materials are available on the Internet

    * It costs about $15 to take the test

    * It costs less than $30 for a dual-band VHF/UHF "handi-talkie" radio from Amazon.com or eBay.com

    * On the other hand, if you have gobs of money, you can spend it in HAM radio ... just as you can spend gobs of money on other hobbies (fancy cars/boats/airplanes, golf clubs, horses, home-entertainment systems, giant-screen TV's, ....) [FWIW, while I have owned and still own more-expensive radios, I paid $200 in 1975 (about $800 in today's inflated greenies) for my favorite HAM rig, a Ten-Tec Triton IV (aka Model 540) which is still going strong!]

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  • Why 220 MHz for Amateur Ham Radio, V2.0?
    June 19, 2015 Ron Kochanowicz

    Why 220 MHz for Amateur Ham Radio, V2.0?

    220 MHz amateur radio boasts of a long and colorful history, affording it a special place in the hearts of amateur radio enthusiasts. 

    Conceptually, amateur radio repeaters are not too different from public safety devices (fire, first response, police) or those in use at federal, business or military services. However, they are often assembled (power supplies, transmitter, receivers, antenna etc.) or commercially packaged to operate only within amateur RF (radio frequency) bands, like 222-224.995 220 MHz band.

    History

    The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) approved VHF bands as early as 1938, one of them being 1.25 meters (224 MHz) band. Amateur radio activity spiked rapidly in 1960s and 1970s, as 2m and 70cm bands swiftly rose to prominence in the hobby. The commercial spectrum of the VHF and UHF bands became the backbone of emergency service communications like police, fire and ems. The 1.25m band however, escaped the commercial popularity - partly due to lack of enough commercial frequency allocations. Add to it, commercial radio equipment for the band has been scarce. Amateurs willing to go live on this band have had to build their own equipment or buy specialized amateur radio equipment from designated manufacturers.

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  • June 17, 2015 Tim King

    BridgeCom visits Ham-Com 2015 Irving, TX

    Here are some thoughts and pictures from our visit to Ham-Com 2015 in Irving, TX.

    BridgeCom Systems Ham-Com 2015 BoothRon and I left the Kansas City, MO area on Thursday morning and it was 80+ degrees.  When we got to TX it was 90+ degrees, so summer is officially here.  

    Driving from MO to TX without the radio on leaves for a lot of random conversation, good, but random.  Ron and I discussed our thoughts and expectations for Ham-Com.  We expected to have a good booth location, plenty of foot traffic, and generate a positive buzz surrounding BridgeCom Systems and our products.  We packed with us three repeaters (BCR-50V, BCR-220, BCR-40U), the new BCM-220 mobile, and our MV-DMR server in a 2U chassis, plus the assorted banners and spec sheets.  

    We arrived in TX about 3:30p Thursday and went straight to the Irving Convention Center to unload and set up.  The people of TX are very nice, lots of yes sir, no sir.  We got set up pretty quickly, we like to keep the booth small with just a few products and brochures.  I'm not a fan of the table across the entire front of the booth, but it seemed to work well this time giving us some shelter from the masses.  However, I should have put the banners out front on the corners where people could have seen them better.

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  • June 13, 2015 Tim King

    Make a BridgeCom Repeater a D-Star Repeater

    BridgeCom BCR Repeater with D-Star modemYes... We've successfully interfaced our BCR repeater with a GMSK modem (D-Star)... the DV RPTR V1 and it works great!
    Here's a quick road to victory for getting a BCR Repeater going with DSTAR.  Yes... the BCR Repeater works fabulous with DSTAR!

    Purchase one of these for each repeater: DVRPTR V1
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